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This Organ Donation Week we’re encouraging families to get together and talk about organ donation

Although the law around organ donation has changed to an opt-out system for adults in England, Wales and Scotland, your family will still be consulted if organ donation is a possibility.

Your family can overturn your decision if they aren’t sure what you want, but 9 in 10 families support organ donation going ahead when they know that’s what their loved ones had wanted.

We’re encouraging everyone in the family – no matter what age – to start talking about organ donation. Even if you’re not sure if you want to donate, having that conversation might help you make up your mind.

Find out more about Organ Donation at Organdonation.nhs.uk 

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This week is Sexual Health Week

This week is Sexual Health Week. If you have any worries, concerns, or questions there is advice and support including what symptoms to look out for and when you should see your GP, available at https://www.nhs.uk/live-well/sexual-health/.

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Worried about breast cancer after the sad news about Sarah Harding?

If you are feeling worried or anxious about breast cancer after the sad news about Sarah Harding, there is support and advice available for you.

Breast Cancer Now have nurses available to answer your questions via their free Helpline 0808 800 6000 or you can find out more about signs and symptoms on their website https://breastcancernow.org/…/signs-symptoms-breast-cancer

You can also find advice at: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/breast-cancer/symptoms/

If you notice any symptoms of breast cancer, such as an unusual lump in your breast or any change in the appearance, feel or shape of your breasts book an appointment to see your GP asap.

The GP will examine you. If they think your symptoms need further assessment, they’ll refer you to a specialist breast cancer clinic.

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Migraine Awareness Week

This week is Migraine Awareness Week and aims to raise awareness of the condition and highlight the impact it has to people living with it.

A migraine is usually a moderate or severe headache felt as a throbbing pain on one side of the head. Many people have symptoms such as nausea, vomiting and increased sensitivity to light or sound.

Migraine is a common health condition affecting around one in every five women and around one in every 15 men. They usually begin in early adulthood.

Simple painkillers such as Paracetamol or Ibuprofen can be effective for migraine. However, be careful not to take too many painkillers as this could make it harder to treat headaches over time.

You should make an appointment to see your GP if you have frequent migraines (on more than five days a month), even if they can be controlled with medication, as you may benefit from preventative treatment.

More information on migraines can be found at https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/migraine/

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World Alzheimer’s Month

This year’s World Alzheimer’s Month is focussing on dementia, highlighting the importance of talking about dementia and raising awareness of how it impacts the daily lives of people affected by the condition.

We know that receiving a dementia diagnosis can leave a person feeling very alone. We have also spoken to primary carers who feel isolated since their loved one received a diagnosis. But you are not alone – there is support available to anyone who is affected by or worried about dementia. You can find information, guidance and support at:

NHS.UK

The Alzheimer’s Society

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Important Information: Blood Tests

A supplier to the NHS has advised us of a global shortage of some equipment used for taking blood tests.

Anyone who needs a test for urgent health problems, will still get one but where your clinician recommends that it’s safe to do so, then you may be asked to come back for a test at a later date, or your appointment may be rescheduled.

Given the nature of the shortage, we cannot give an exact date for when the test will be rescheduled, but please be assured that if your condition or symptoms require it, then you will get a test, and we will be re-booking your test when supplies become more easily available.

If your condition or symptoms change or get worse, please contact the NHS as you would normally.

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Practice Closed for August Bank Holiday

Please note that our Practice will be closed for the August Bank Holiday on Monday 30 August 2021. We will re-open as normal on Tuesday 31 August 2021. If during this time you require medical advice or treatment you can: Visit your pharmacy Your local pharmacy can provide confidential, expert advice and treatment for a range of common illnesses and complaints. Opening times for local Pharmacies can be downloaded or you can visit NHS Choices. Access NHS 111 If you need urgent medical advice but your condition is not life threatening, you can access NHS 111 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, either online or via phone. To access the service online simply visit 111.nhs.uk, enter your age, sex, postcode and main symptom, and then you will be guided through a series of questions about your health problems. To access the service via phone, simply dial 111 from any mobile or landline free of charge and you will be put through to an operator who will run through a few questions regarding your health problem in order to get you the right care. A&E or 999 For a genuine medical emergency including; loss of consciousness, acute confused state and fits that are not stopping, persistent and or/severe chest pain, breathing difficulties, severe bleeding that cannot be stopped call 999 or go to your nearest A&E.
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World Breastfeeding Week 1st-7th August 2021

World Breastfeeding Week (1st – 7th August) aims to highlight the benefits that breastfeeding can have.

Breastfeeding is a skill that takes time to get the hang of. Lots of mums wonder if their baby’s feeding well and getting enough – especially in the first few days. But once you’ve mastered it, you’ll probably find it’s the easiest and most satisfying way to feed your baby.

You can visit the NHS Start 4 Life website which hosts lots of information about breastfeeding from how to breastfeed, expressing and what happens when you go back to work.

You can also call The National Breastfeeding Helpline which is open every day from 9.30am – 9.30pm for confidential breastfeeding information and support – 0300 1000212.

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Don’t let hay fever ruin your summer!

From now until September is when the pollen count is at its highest, especially when its warm, humid and windy.

Some of the symptoms of hay fever can include:

  • Sneezing and coughing
  • A runny or blocked nose
  • Itchy, red or watery eyes
  • Itchy throat, mouth, nose and ears
  • Loss of smell
  • Pain around your temples and forehead
  • Headache
  • Earache
  • Feeling tired

If you are having any of the above symptoms or are feeling the effects of hay fever, visit your local pharmacist as they can provide advice and treatments to suit your symptoms. You could also try:

  • not drying your washing outside when pollen levels are high
  • showering and changing your clothes after you’ve been outside to wash any pollen away
  • wearing wraparound sunglasses when you go outside to stop the pollen from irritating your eyes
  • putting Vaseline around your nose to trap pollen
  • keeping windows and doors shut as much as possible
  • vacuuming regularly and dust with a damp cloth
  • staying indoors when the pollen count is high

You can keep an eye on the pollen forecast on the Met Office Website.

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Don’t let embarrassment stop you from getting your cervical smear test!

This Cervical Cancer Prevention week don’t let embarrassment stop you from getting your cervical smear test!

Cervical screening prevents 75% of cervical cancers from developing, yet one in four of those invited for a screening in the UK, don’t attend.

Cervical Screening is the method of detecting abnormal cells on the cervix. Being screened regularly means any abnormal changes in the cells can be identified and, if necessary treated to stop cancer developing.

All women and people with a cervix in the UK aged 25 to 49 are invited for a screening test every three years and those aged 50 to 64 are invited every five years.

What happens when you go for your cervical screening?

The screening test usually takes around 5 minutes to carry out.

You’ll be asked to undress from the waist down and lie on a couch, although you can remain fully dressed if you are wearing a loose skirt/dress.

The nurse or doctor will gently put an instrument called a speculum into your vagina, this holds the walls of the vagina open so the cervix can be seen.

The nurse or doctor will then use a small soft brush to gently collect some cells from the surface of your cervix. Although the procedure can be a little uncomfortable, it shouldn’t be painful. However, if you do find it painful let the doctor or nurse know as they may be able to reduce your discomfort.

Once the sample is taken, the doctor or nurse will close the curtain allowing you to dress whilst they prepare the sample to be sent off to the laboratory.

The cell sample is then sent off to a laboratory for analysis and you should receive the result within 2 weeks.

Many are nervous and embarrassed about the process of cervical screening, but there is no need to be, nurses and doctors carry out these tests every day. You are also welcome to bring a chaperone to your appointment if this would make you more comfortable.

More information about cervical screening can be found at:
NHS.UK
Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust